Bicycle rules, standards and safety

Before starting to ride, bicycle riders should be familiar with bicycle standards and equipment, legislation for use of shared paths, roads, intersections and footpaths.

  ABC Bike Check

Before you head out for a ride, itís a good idea to do a quick maintenance check to ensure your bike is in safe working order, especially if it hasnít been ridden for a while. 

This is as simple as ABC Ė Air, Brakes, Chain.

Watch the short video to see how quick and easy it is to do an ABC Bike Check on your bike today. 

If you detect any issues, or are unsure of anything, it is recommended that you visit your local bike shop for advice.

Note: Please view the page in landscape mode

  Cycling rules: rules affecting cyclists and motorists in WA

All-age cycling on footpaths is legal in Western Australia. Anyone can cycle on a footpath, but there are some conditions. See the Road Safety Commission website for more details.

Before starting to ride, bicycle riders should be familiar with bicycle standards and equipment, legislation for use of shared paths, roads, intersections and footpaths.

A full list of the legislations can be found in the Road Traffic (Authorisation to Drive) Act 2008 and Road Traffic (Authorisation to Drive) Regulations 2014.

Opens in a new window Australasian Legal Information Institute (AustLII): Road Traffic Act 1974
Opens in a new window Australasian Legal Information Institute (AustLII): WA Road Traffic Code 2000 index
Opens in a new window Road Safety Commission: Cycling
Opens in a new window Road Safety Commission: Cycling on footpaths
Opens in a new window Department of Justice: Road Traffic (Authorisation to Drive) Act 2008
Opens in a new window Department of Justice: Road Traffic (Authorisation to Drive) Regulations 2014

  Bicycle standards and requirements overview

A bicycle is a legal vehicle, with two or more wheels, that is built to be propelled by human power through a belt, chain or gears. Electric bicycles, penny farthings and tricycles are considered bicycles.

An electric bike, or e-bike are they are commonly known, is a bicycle fitted with an auxiliary motor(s) to provide assistance to the rider in propelling the vehicle.

There are two main types of e-bikes:

  1. Power Assisted Pedal Cycles (PAPCs), which may have a motor up to 200 watts; and,
  2. Pedelecs (complying with European Standard EN 15194), which may have a motor up to 250 watts.

The power assistance for both PAPCs and pedelecs must cut out at 25 km/h and the width of the bikes, or their loads, cannot exceed 660 mm.

Vehicles not considered bicycles are wheelchairs, wheeled recreational devices like Segways, wheeled toys like scooters, skateboards or skates, or any vehicle with an auxiliary motor capable of generating a power output over 250 watts (whether or not the motor is operating).

There are standard requirements that need to be met before a bicycle can be considered legal for use on public roads and shared paths.

For the rules and regulations related to bicycles including e-bikes, visit the Road Safety Commission cycling web pages.

Opens in a new window Australasian Legal Information Institute (AustLII): Road Traffic Code 2000 - Reg 228
Opens in a new window Road Safety Commission: Cycling

  Electric rideable devices (eRideables) rules and regulations

Western Australians have embraced the use of electric rideable devices (ERDs), also known as eRideables, personal mobility devices and electric or e-scooters, for transport and fun.

The WA Government recognises the safety risks, as well as the convenient travel choice ERDs offer and has amended the Road Traffic Code 2000 to facilitate the safe use of ERDs in line with public expectation.

Electric or e-scooters, electric unicycles, electric skateboards, electric roller-skates, one-wheel electric scooters and hoverboards are classified as ERDs.

The maximum speed for ERDs on bike and shared paths and local roads has been set at 25km/h, which is consistent with regulations in Queensland, the ACT and New Zealand, and is the same speed at which the power output on electric bikes cuts out.

The speed limit on footpaths and in pedestrian areas, however, is much lower at 10km/h reflecting the speed differential between different path user groups.

Riders are required to give way to pedestrians and keep to the left of oncoming bicycle riders or other ERD users. They are not permitted to travel on a separated footpath designated for the use of pedestrians.

Other new rules for ERDs and their users include:

  • Riders of higher powered electric rideable devices must be at least 16 years of age;
  • Riders must wear an approved helmet, use lights and reflectors at night and have a working warning device; and
  • The same mobile phone and drink and drug driving rules apply as for motor vehicle drivers.

Under existing Western Australian rules, children under the age of 16 years are permitted to use motorised scooters that have a maximum power output of 200w and maximum speed of 10 km/h.

For more information, consult the Road Safety Commission website.

External Link Road Safety Commission - eRideables
Page last updated: Fri Dec 3 2021 12:08:32 PM